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The Secret Story of Soil

Chris, the owner of Say Hay Farms in northern California’s Yolo County (northwest of Sacramento), isn’t what most people would think of as a typical farmer. A UC Berkeley graduate with a degree in Philosophy, he’s a brilliantly articulate admirer of soil. Chris wants us to think about “dirt” differently. His main lesson: it’s alive, “a giant living web.” Soil teems with an ecosystem of countless microbes, crucial to growing healthy, delicious produce like Say Hay’s gorgeous orange cauliflower, hearty beets and petite shokichi squash. “Once you kill that ecosystem it takes a lot of work to build it back up,” he says. “It’s not something that you can take lightly.”
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Customer Spotlight: Crystal Hypes

In January of 2016, her food resolution was to continue on a weight loss journey by cooking with Blue Apron. Check out a few of our favorite moments from our chat with Crystal below!
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DIY Pea Shoots Grow Kits

Did you know that in about just two weeks, you can harvest easy-to-grow, flavorful pea shoots right at home? No backyard or garden required! Keep reading for the instructions on how to turn your grow kit into a pot for your pea shoots! But first… Read more »

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America’s Tiny Farmers

One of our favorite things about summer is cooking with delicious summer squash. Tender and versatile, summer squash comes in a dazzling array of shapes and sizes, from zucchini to green and yellow zephyr to round eight ball to pattypan (think adorable flying saucer). Like tomatoes, corn and eggplant, summer squash is a seasonal must. But growing it isn’t a simple proposition. It takes serious teamwork, and one of the the most important players isn’t human. Buzzing between squash blossoms, tiny bees perform an essential service: in exchange for sugary nectar, they transfer pollen, which allows the plant to fruit. Read more »

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Our Commitment to Sustainable Seafood

We believe sustainability is the most vital ingredient to great seafood. That’s why we’ve partnered with Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch®, a non-profit organization who shares our commitment to building a better food system and is one of the world’s most well-respected guides to sustainable seafood. As much as we love cooking with fish, we recognize the urgent need to source it responsibly. The ocean covers 71 percent of the Earth’s surface and is home to more than one million species. We rely on it for everything from our livelihoods to the air we breathe to providing us with a steady supply of healthy, delicious seafood. But just as we depend on the ocean for so much, it in turn depends on us for protection. Read more »

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How Delicious Italian Cheese is Crafted

Meet Belfiore, a family-run cheesemaker in Berkeley, CA. See how they make their cheese with patience, dedication, and only the finest ingredients in our latest partner video! Read more »

Reduce Food Waste

5 Easy Ways to Put Your Food Scraps to Use

We’re always looking for ways to make the most of every ingredient both inside and out of our box, using the fennel bulb and the fronds, the juice and the zest of citrus, and the stems and the leaves of our herbs. But, not every recipe is right for every piece of the plant. So, see below for five ways we save our scraps when we can’t use them in a recipe. Read more »

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Home Cook Hall of Fame: Dan Barber

We consider cooking the best method of doing dinner, and so we’re featuring chefs and foodies who’ve made a difference in our at-home eating lives. Today, meet Dan Barber of Blue Hill. Read more »

How to Make Bacon in the Oven

Home Chef: Bakin’ Bacon

Here’s something you might not know about cooking bacon: you should do this messy yet essential cooking task in the oven. Read more »

How to Make Veg Stock with Scraps From Your Kitchen

Vegetable Scraps Aren’t Kitchen Waste, They’re Soup Material

It’s just a guess, but I’m betting that vegetable consumption across the U.S. is at an all-time high each January. But when you eat lots of veggies, you end up with lots of veggie scraps. I always strive to reduce food waste in my kitchen, so instead of throwing those scraps in the garbage, I use them to make delicious homemade vegetable stock.
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