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The Almond Brothers

Meet California’s John, Jim, and Joe Gardiner, whose big ambition yields an amazing little nut. Read more »

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The Magic of the Pixie Mandarin

An intrepid family’s quest for better-tasting citrus Read more »

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Colin Leggett, Sweet Potato Guru

Ten-year-old Colin Leggett says there’s one ingredient he says he would never, ever eat the orange tuber without: brown sugar. And no, he’s not just talking a spoonful or two of the sweet stuff. He says that he’d pour an entire cup over the split potato, still steaming after having been just pulled from the hot oven.
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Meet Italy’s Most Passionate Tomato Farmer

August in Italy: businesses are closed, cities have emptied out, towns are deserted—everyone is at the beach. Everyone, that is, except for tomato farmers in the Campania region, Italy’s tomato capital. Here, in late summer, trucks loaded with the vibrant, just-harvested fruits crowd tiny, one-lane streets. And at the center of it all is one third-generation farmer, wearing an easy smile and a straw hat to block out the sun—but nonetheless deeply tanned from hours in the fields—and covered from head to toe in tomato pulp. Meet Giuseppe. Read more »

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Where In-The-Know Fish Lovers Get Their Goods

It’s 10 o’clock on a Friday morning. On a hushed, industrial street in Greenpoint—a booming neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York—there’s a pretty long line for… something.

The line spills out of a narrow steel door on the side of a squat brick building. It contains a patchwork of people, young and old: most keep to themselves, holding cell phones and to-go cups of coffee, while others chat in English and Polish and Russian. Almost all of these people are smiling from ear to ear. Read more »

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Cranberry Chili

The problem with being a fourth generation cranberry farmer from Cranberry Country, Massachusetts—the southeastern part of the state that is pretty much covered in bogs—is that you, unfortunately, get typecast.

“People know that if you’re having dinner at our house, it’s probably going to have cranberries in it,” says Patrick Rhodes. Patrick is the latest in a long line of cranberry-growing, and cranberry-loving Rhodes’ who have been raising the tart, acidic treats since the 1930s. Like most folks, sure, they use them at Thanksgiving table. But the Rhodes family is so enamored with the little red berries they grow, that they eat them at pretty much every meal. Read more »

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