Blue Apron Tomatillo Poblano Sauce

tomatillo poblano sauce

Recreate Blue Apron’s signature tomatillo poblano sauce at home. You can use this recipe to replicate your favorite Blue Apron meals, or you can improvise. Try it on any protein, bean dishes, or roasted vegetables. For a creamy kick, stir a spoonful into yogurt or sour cream to make a rich sauce.

This recipe makes more than our standard packages, but don’t worry. The leftovers will keep in the fridge for up to a week. You can use them to spice up everything from breakfast tacos to seared steaks.

Tomatillo poblano sauce ingredients
Tomatillo poblano sauce ingredients

Tomatillo poblano sauce recipe

  • 6 medium tomatillos, about 1 lb, husks removed, rinsed, and left whole
  • 1 small onion, quartered
  • 1  jalapeño, whole
  • 1 poblano, whole
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and left whole
  • The juice of 1 lime, about 2 tablespoons
  • 1 small bunch cilantro leaves and tender stems, about 20 grams

Place an oven rack in the center of the oven; preheat to 450°F. Line a sheet pan with foil. Transfer the prepared tomatillos, onion, jalapeño, poblano, and garlic to the sheet pan. Drizzle generously with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Toss to coat and arrange in an even layer. Roast 14 to 16 minutes, or until the vegetables are browned and tender when pierced with a knife. Remove from the oven and let cool.

Remove and discard the stems from the roasted poblano and jalapeño. Transfer the roasted vegetables to a blender or food processor. Add the lime juice and cilantro. Pulse or blend until thoroughly combined and mostly smooth. Taste, then season with salt and pepper if desired. Enjoy!

Recipes with tomatillo poblano sauce

Southwest-Style Turkey Skillet

This delightful skillet brings together all the classic taco fixings: black beans, melty cheese, tomatoes, and creamy guacamole for a crowd-pleasing meal.

Tomatillo-Poblano Chicken Thighs

chicken thighs with tomatillo poblano sauce

 This dish showcases our bright tomatillo-poblano sauce, which we’re mixing with rich mascarpone cheese to make a creamy, zesty sauce for our seared chicken—perfectly accompanied by a trio of roasted squash, potatoes, and onion.

Pepita & Panko-Crusted Tofu

tofu with tomatillo poblano sauce

These hearty tofu steaks get an incredibly flavorful, crispy exterior when baked under layers of traditional Mexican spices, sweet honey, and a duo of panko breadcrumbs and chopped pepitas (or pumpkin seeds). We’re finishing them with a drizzle of our bright tomatillo-poblano sauce, which also gets stirred into a simple side of brown rice.

Mexican-Spiced Shrimp Bake

Bold, zesty flavors abound in this comforting dish thanks to spices like smoked paprika, cayenne pepper, and more that coat the shrimp, vegetables, and crunchy breadcrumb topping, and a zesty tomatillo-sour cream sauce that’s drizzled on top.

For more flavorful sauces, try our favorite pesto recipe.

The Top 10 Blue Apron Recipes of All-Time 

We’re celebrating our birthday with a look back at some of our favorite recipes throughout the years. The Blue Apron menu is always changing. We introduce new ingredients and techniques every year. We love every meal we make, and it’s hard to play favorites. These are some of our all-time most memorable dishes.

2012: Barbecue Cornish Game Hen with Coleslaw & Sauteed Corn

cornish game hen recipe

Barbecue chicken with slaw and corn is traditional across the American South. Flavors of the sauce itself can vary from state to state. Ours has a terrific balance of sweet and tangy notes and coats a Cornish game hen in place of chicken. We spice up the typical coleslaw and corn with sesame oil and cilantro. It’s a flavorful twist on an American classic.

2013: Maple & Ginger Glazed Salmon with Watercress, Orange & Parsnip Salad

maple ginger salmon

Parsnips have been a staple food in Europe and Asia since ancient times. They resemble carrots in shape and texture, but have a cream-colored, uniquely flavored flesh. Though they can be harvested year round, the best parsnips are plucked in spring, after the winter frosts. Cold weather turns some of the starch in parsnips to natural sugar and preserves their crunch, making them the perfect, subtly sweet addition to this salad.

2014: Thai Shrimp Soup with Coconut, Lemongrass & Red Curry

coconut thai shrimp

In this recipe, we’re using lemongrass, an ancient Southeast Asian herb, two different ways. First, we’re smashing one of the stalks, and simmering it in the coconut milk broth to infuse the dish with flavor. We’re also thinly slicing another stalk and briefly sautéing it with other aromatics (garlic, ginger and scallion). This step brings a wonderful crunch to the rich curry, adding texture and brightness to each bite.

2015: Chicken & Sage Biscuit Pot Pie with Cremini Mushrooms & Purple Top Turnip

chicken pot pie

Chicken pot pie is the ultimate comfort food. We love breaking through a flaky pastry crust into a rich stew of chicken and vegetables. Here, we’re doing something special with the crust: replacing it with mouthwatering, fresh sage-infused biscuits. These “drop biscuits” (named for the technique of spooning them onto a filling) have an amazing effect: the stew steams the dough, creating an almost dumpling-like bottom, while the top becomes golden brown, crumbly and utterly delicious.

2016: Steaks au Poivre with Crispy Fingerling Potatoes & Sautéed Kale

steak and potatoes

Steak au poivre, or peppered steak, is a French bistro classic. It features steak coated with a layer of cracked peppercorns, then served under a peppercorn cream sauce. We’re doing just that in this recipe, making our pan sauce with smooth crème fraîche. And we’re completing the steaks with fingerling potatoes­—boiled, then browned on the stove until perfectly crisp (a preparation known in French as “pommes rissolées”)­—and a light sauté of Parmesan-enriched kale.

2017: Shiitake Mushroom Burgers with Miso Mayonnaise & Roasted Sweet Potato

mushroom burger

Chefs, the secret to these burgers’ spectacular umami (or savory) flavor is dried shiitake mushrooms, which pack even more potency than their fresh counterparts. After rehydrating the mushrooms with a bit of hot water, we’re adding them directly to our patties, along with hoisin sauce for a salty-sweet touch. A creamy spread of mayo and miso paste is the perfect complement to the juicy burgers.

2018: Spicy Chicken & Stir-Fried Vegetables with Jasmine Rice

chicken stir fry

In this dish, a coating of rice flour on chopped chicken just before it hits a hot pan creates a delicate crust—perfect for soaking up a flavorful sauce made with spicy sambal oelek. It’s balanced by fluffy jasmine rice and vegetables stir-fried in a tangy-sweet sauce.

2019: Spicy Chicken & Vegetable Stir-Fry with Persimmon Rice

chicken stir fry

This easy stir-fry brings together tender bites of chicken, bok choy, and carrot with a unique sauce made with miso paste, ponzu sauce, and Thai yellow curry paste—for savory-sweet flavor and a layer of bright heat. It’s served over simple jasmine rice, which gets a sweet lift from persimmon, an autumn fruit beloved in many Asian cuisines.

2020: Ginger Pork Meatballs with Bok Choy & White Rice

pork meatballs

We’re giving these pork meatballs an aromatic twist thanks to the fresh ginger mixed in. It’s all boosted by the punchy combo of barbecue sauce and soy glaze we’re using to finish the meatballs and tender bok choy.

2021: Calabrian Beef & Gnocchi with Zucchini & Romano Cheese

gnocchi with beef

Plump gnocchi and ground beef get a delicious kick from Calabrian chile paste, a specialty ingredient from southern Italy known for its irresistibly sweet-hot flavor. We’re finishing it all with a bit of mascarpone cheese, which balances out the heat and provides creamy texture.


All done with dinner? Keep celebrating with a slice of birthday cake.

Introducing the Blue Apron Tailgating Box

This fall, get ready for game day with Blue Apron. Host an at-home watch party or a family movie night with our new Tailgating box, inspired by classic game day treats. Recreate the ultimate viewing party experience at home with hearty, elevated party snacks.

Skip menu planning stress and last-minute trips to the grocery store with this party in a box. All the ingredients you need are delivered straight to your door. Our chefs designed this menu to be both satisfying and snackable. These crowd-pleasing dishes are finger-food friendly—forks and spoons are strictly optional. 

The Menu

Queso Fundido with Chorizo & Fresh Tomato Salsa

A cheesy, meaty delight topped with fresh salsa for a refreshing kick.

Sweet & Spicy Chicken Sandwiches with Buttermilk Dressing & Carrot Slaw

Flavorful chicken gets a spicy kick from hot honey, all sandwiched between soft, fluffy buns. 

BBQ Pulled Pork Tacos with Mango Salsa & Guacamole

Make your own tropical salsa for these satisfying pork tacos. Don’t worry about elaboration prep—we’re sending peeled and pitted mango and cooked pulled pork. Just chop, sauté, and go. 

The Tailgating box is portioned to serve 8 people. It will be available on the menu and in the marketplace starting 9/5. With a menu like this, your party is sure to be a hit. Even if you’re not watching the game, you’ll want to come for the food.

New Easy Options Hit the Menu with Ready to Cook

ready to cook meals
Oven-baked Ready to Cook meals from Blue Apron

What’s better than a home-cooked meal after a busy day? It sounds delightful, but if you’re the one cooking, it can mean even more work. Blue Apron is here to lend a hand with new, Ready to Cook options that cut down on preparation and cleanup time. 

Ready to Cook meals are as easy as combine, bake, and serve. Put down that knife and relax! Our chefs reduced preparation time by designing recipes that don’t require any chopping at all. Each dish is cooked entirely within the oven—there’s no need to fuss with multiple burners or a crowded stovetop. Ready to cook meals are combined and baked in an included aluminum tray that can be rinsed and recycled after use. Without sticky pots and pans, cleanup is a breeze.

These recipes include the same high-quality ingredients and sophisticated flavors that you expect from Blue Apron, but with less time spent in the kitchen. Try Ready to Cook options to enjoy homemade meals a fraction of the time, even on the busiest nights of the week.

Look for these Ready to Cook recipes (& more!) coming soon

  • Oven-Baked Cheesy Tomato Gnocchi with Calabrian Chile & Spinach
  • Oven-Baked Chorizo & Black Bean Tacos with Jalapeño & Monterey Jack
  • Oven-Baked Sweet Chili Udon & Vegetables with Coconut Chips & Sesame Seeds
  • Oven-Baked Pesto Chicken & Orzo with Spinach, Tomatoes & Ricotta

These recipes will be available on the 2-serving and 4-serving menus. Find them online or in the Blue Apron app alongside our core recipes. Recipes will rotate, bringing you fresh and exciting options on a weekly basis.

Ready to Cook options are arriving on the menu in time for fall, when schedules fill up, and easy meals become a true necessity. View options on the menu starting 7/29, in boxes by 8/29.

All About Shishito Peppers & 3 Delicious Recipes

Charred peppers just need a sprinkle of salt

Tender, smoky shishito peppers are a restaurant staple—but they’re easy to use at home too. These vibrantly green and slightly smoky Japanese chiles—shaped a bit like wrinkled fingers— have become a late summer and early fall favorite on menus across the country. It’s for good reason: they’re delicious, super snackable, and, despite their fancy appearance when blistered and sprinkled with flaky salt, incredibly easy to prepare. Shishito peppers are small green peppers of Japanese origin. These peppers ripen from green to red, but they’re typically harvested while still green. 

These peppers have a very thin skin. Their delicate nature means that they will cook quickly compared to heartier varieties like bell peppers. They are often served lightly charred or blistered. This can be done in a pan or on the grill. Either way, it will take less than 10 minutes. After they’re charred, they can be served as a snack with just a sprinkle of crunchy salt, or incorporated into a dish. 

How to cook shishito peppers 

Char the peppers:
Charring peppers in a pan

Charring or blistering these small peppers is simple. All you need is a pan and a heat proof spoon or spatula. 

In a large pan (nonstick, if you have one), heat a drizzle of olive oil on medium-high until hot. Add the peppers in an even layer. Cook, without stirring, 3 to 4 minutes, or until lightly browned; season with salt and pepper. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, 4 to 5 minutes, or until charred and softened. Season to your liking and serve immediately. 

Should you remove the seeds?

Leave those ribs and seeds alone! Shishitos can be eaten whole, so all you have to do is cut off the stem—unless you serve them as finger food, where the stem can act as a nifty handle. Each pepper contains a lot of seeds (more than you might expect), but they’re totally edible and don’t need to be removed.

Are shishito peppers spicy?

While most shishito peppers are mild, about 1 in 10 is spicy. The occasional hot one is the result of over-exposure to the sun. Unfortunately (or fortunately, if you’re a thrill seeker) there are no visual cues for spiciness; while the peppers turn red as they ripen, that’s not indicative of flavor, so bite carefully!

Can you eat shishito peppers raw?

Shishito peppers can be eaten raw, although it’s more common to serve them charred or blistered. If eaten raw, they will have a slightly sweeter, fruiter taste. 

Recipes with shishito peppers 

Pair shishito peppers with crunchy green beans for a healthy green side dish. 

Top charred peppers with fragrant lime salt for extra fruity flavor. 

Roasted peppers add flavor and texture to this Mexican-inspired grain bowl. 

How to Store Herbs

how to store herbs in a glass
Store rooted herbs in water

Fresh herbs are irreplaceable. When you add them to a dish, they bring delicate flavors and beautiful aromatics that their dried counterparts simply can’t match. Using fresh herbs, whether it’s a few springs dropped on top of a grain bowl or several handfuls chopped into a salad, is a surefire way to take a dish from good to excellent. Cooking with herbs also shows that you care. They’re a delicious ingredient, but let’s be honest—they can be a bit fussy. A dinner packed with parsley and dill means that the cook took the time to wash, dry, and store herbs. The effort is worth it, but it’s effort nonetheless. 

Fresh herbs are often sold by the bunch, but most dishes only use a few tablespoons. This presents both a problem and an opportunity. Leftover herbs mean more flavorful meals in your future, but storing them can be a pain. Herbs have a short shelf life, and can grow limp, dry, or slimy if not used within a few days. Learning how to store herbs properly can help them last longer. Follow these tips and you should be able to get through the whole bouquet before they go bad.

How to store herbs to extend their shelf life 

If available, buy rooted herbs 

Some grocery stores and markets offer herbs with the roots attached. These bunches will last longer than trimmed alternatives. The roots can still absorb moisture and nutrients, and will help keep the plant alive if stored properly. 

Store herbs upright in glass

Fill a small glass or recycled jar with an inch of water. Arrange your leftover herbs in the glass like a bouquet of flowers and store them upright in the refrigerator. The added water will help keep the herbs fresh, and storing them upright prevents them from coming into contact with the shelves of your refrigerator. This method also keeps leftover herbs top of mind. If it’s easy to see them when you open the refrigerator, you’re more likely to remember to use them. 

Or wrap in damp paper towel

Wrapping in a damp paper towel will keep your herbs moist and organized neatly. If you’re worried about the towel absorbing odors from the refrigerator, try placing the entire bundle in a ziploc bag. 

how to store herbs in a bag
Keep the bag open to allow airflow

Avoid covering them tightly 

Most produce gives off CO2 as it rests. Trapping this gas can help fruits and vegetables ripen even after they’re picked (this is why we store unripe bananas or tomatoes in brown paper bags) but it will also accelerate decay. To keep herbs from getting slimy, make sure there’s plenty of airflow. If you’re storing them in a ziploc bag, try keeping the bag open to allow the gas to escape. 

Looking for ways to use extra herbs? Try tossing them all in a classic frittata.

Sfoglini’s Cascatelli Pasta Has Arrived on Our Menu

cascatelli noodles
Photo credit: Scott Gordon Bleicher

The name cascatelli comes from the Italian word for “waterfalls.” Take one look at these rippling strands of pasta and you’ll see why. 

All those ripples aren’t just there for beauty. This pasta was invented by Dan Pashman, the host and creator of the Sporkful podcast, who designed it with three key elements in mind.

dan pashman with cascatelli
Dan Pashman in the Sfoglini factory, Photo credit: Scott Gordon Bleicher

The first, “sauceability” is a term introduced to the pasta lexicon by Pashman. It refers to a noodle’s ability to grab and hold onto sauce. The ruffles and ridges of each cascatelli noodle hug sauce tightly, creating a perfect dish of pasta where each bite is composed of the ideal ratio of sauce to noodle.  

Pashman also craved a noodle with perfect forkability and toothsinkability. His ideal pasta is easy to eat with a fork. It can be stabbed and lifted without noodles slipping all around the plate. Toothsinkability refers to the satisfying texture of each bite.

Pashman partnered with Sfoglini Pasta to bring this new noodle into the world. Sfoglini Pasta is an artisanal pasta company founded in Brooklyn in 2012. Co-creators Steve Gonzalez and Scott Ketchum share a serious passion for pasta. Gonzales worked as a chef for over 14 years, creating the handmade pasta for beloved New York restaurants like Hearth, Roberta’s, and Frankies Sputino. At Sfoglini, he oversees all things culinary, ensuring their pastas match the standards of any high-end kitchen. Ketchum oversees the creative side of the brand, drawing on his 18 years of experience as a designer in New York and San Francisco. Today, Sfoglini produces over 25 types of pasta, including cascatelli, in their Hudson Valley factory. Each batch of cascatelli is extruded through a bronze die, which creates a slightly rough surface that helps even more sauce cling to these noodles.

blue apron cascatelli dish
Creamy Calabrian Shrimp & Cascatelli

To complement the unique texture of cascatelli, the Blue Apron team created a recipe Creamy Calabrian Shrimp & Cascatelli with Salsa Verde Zucchini. After reviewing the recipe, Dan Pashman approves:

Ever since I invented cascatelli, people have been asking me what they should cook with it. I think sauces that are thick and/or creamy are fantastic, because the shape holds those sauces so well between its ruffles. Preparations with big, stabbable chunks like cut up vegetables or shrimp are also great, because cascatelli is so hearty and forkable, so you can assemble great bites by stabbing the pasta along with those other chunky components. That’s why I’m thrilled that the chefs at Blue Apron came up with a preparation that is thick, creamy, and chunky—and full of spice and flavor too! It’s an ideal dish to highlight cascatelli’s sauceability, forkability, and toothsinkability.

For cascatelli and countless other delights delivered right to your door, order your next Blue Apron box now.

How to store Tomatoes

how to store summer tomatoes

Perfectly ripe tomatoes are one of the great joys of summer. Very little can compare to an heirloom tomato picked up at the farmer’s market in August, but even grocery store tomatoes will be at their best during this time. After you get home, before you get to crafting your BLT or perfect Caprese salad, you’ll want to store tomatoes in a way that preserves their flavor and texture. 

The standard advice is to store your tomatoes outside of the refrigerator. Most home refrigerators hover around 37ºF. This is much colder than the ideal temperature for a tomato. Storing a tomato in the refrigerator can mute its flavors and degrade its texture. If you’ve ever eaten a tomato with a loose skin and overly soft flesh, a refrigerator might be to blame. Local tomatoes purchased at the farmer’s market have likely never been refrigerated, and they’ll have a robust flavor to show for it. Conventional tomatoes purchased at a supermarket were probably in cold storage before hitting the shelves, and may be slightly older than their local counterparts. 

Of course, nothing in life can be simple. A perfectly ripe heirloom tomato won’t last long at room temperature. Ripe tomatoes should be eaten immediately, or they will quickly grow mold and rot. If you can’t use your ripe tomatoes immediately, storing them in the fridge will prevent rot for a few days.

Tomatoes that aren’t yet at peak ripeness should be stored on the counter. The amount of time they will last on the counter depends on environmental factors, like the heat and humidity in your apartment. To help retain moisture, store them stem-side down on a plate or tray. Over a few days, moisture can escape out of the top of a tomato if it’s stored stem-side up, causing it to turn soft and wrinkly. Storing them face down helps retain this moisture (read more about this phenomenon in this excellent article from Serious Eats). For vine-ripened or vine on tomatoes, remove the excess stem before storing. 

summer tomato sandwich

Once they reach peak ripeness, it’s time to use them. Whip up your favorite recipe or take the simple route and make a classic summer treat: a tomato sandwich with nothing but tomato, mayonnaise, and a generous sprinkle of flaky salt.

Best Wines for Summer Dinners

The best wines for summer depend on the occasion. Some of our warm weather favorites are perfect for sipping on the beach, while others are best when paired with dinner.

Summer is traditionally a time for chilled whites and rosé wines, but if you’re serving up hearty grilled fare, a robust red will bring out the best in your dinner. Try some of these bottles to keep your glass filled all summer long.

Sparkling wine

best wines for summer, sparkling
Sparkling wine bundle

Blue Barrel brut sparkling wines are delicious on their own, with salty cheeses, or with delicate summer seafoods. Try enjoying these wines chilled with grilled shrimp or raw oysters for a delightful summery treat.

 Pairing tip: For fresh flavor, try a high-acid wine

Wines with tart acidity can enhance the flavors of fresh vegetables. Try a bright white like a sauvignon blanc to enliven our Summer Bean & Goat Cheese Panzanella.

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Big bold reds

best red wines for summer
Big bold reds bundle


Delicate whites can be a lovely summer treat, but when the grill is out, a red is your best bet. Complex, smoky wines like the el Rede malbec will enhance the flavor of the grill and pair well with beautifully charred steaks or burgers.

Pairing tip: Make it meaty

An oak-aged red wine will combine fruity flavors with notes of warming spice. These full flavors complement richer dishes, and the tannins will cleanse and prime your palate for another bite. Pair reds with burgers like our Ginger Pork Burger.

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Pairing tip: Spice is nice

Dishes with plents of spices—not hot spice, per se—can play well with the spice aromas in oak-aged red wine. Try an oaky red with dishes like our Spiced Lamb & Beef Tagine.

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Beautiful rosé wines

rose wines for summer
Endless summer rosé bundle

The thing to love about this wine is how delightfully deceptive it is. Its fruity aromas suggest the wine is sugary—yet it’s almost completely dry, with a bright zestiness that makes your mouth water for more. The powerful, alluring aromas and overall vibrancy of the wine are what help it pair so well with wildly different types of dishes.

Paring tip: Think light, summery fare

A light, crisp wine draws out the fresh flavors of vegetables, and makes something like a simple as a salad taste more exciting. These particular wine’s aromas will add an extra dimension to our Romaine, Potato & Snap Pea Salad.

Pairing tip: Opposites often do attract

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In the same way that fruit matches spice or hot matches sour, a light, floral wine can often provide a delightful contrast to an earthy, savory dish. Sometimes it takes just one ingredient to bridge the gap, as black garlic does in our Shoyu Ramen.

Try these wines by subscription, or order ala carte from our marketplace.

How to Roast and Blanch Almonds

This guide to almonds was contributed by Nikki Miller-Ka. Nikki is a culinary expert and social media influencer based in North Carolina. A former associate editor at Food And Wine, her favorite things to cook are tacos and biscuits. 

Depending on how they’re prepared, almonds can be slightly sweet, rich and toasty, or mild and buttery. This versatile ingredient can be the golden brown star of a dish, or it can subtly enhance a recipe as a garnish. Almonds have a high oil content, giving them a long shelf life when handled and stored properly. Whole, sliced, diced, slivered, ground, chopped, or blanched—almonds add flavor and texture to just about any savory or sweet recipe.

All almonds taste nuttier and richer when they’re roasted. Roasting almonds brings their natural oils to the surface, and also crisps up the bronze, papery skins. Roasting nuts deepens their flavor, rendering them richer, nuttier, and more complex. It also gives them a crispier texture that shines in many recipes. There are two ways to roast almonds: in the oven or in a frying pan. Read on for instructions for both methods.

How to roast almonds

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or aluminum foil.

Place almonds in a single layer on the sheet. To enhance browning, it’s optional to use a neutral oil and drizzle a small amount (1-2 teaspoons total) over the nuts and toss to coat evenly. Roast whole almonds in the preheated oven for 10-12 minutes, sliced almonds for 5-7 minutes, and slivered almonds for 6-8 minutes. Place in the oven and check every 5 minutes. 

Stir and shake the pan so that the nuts are redistributed to roast evenly. When the nuts are browned and smell nutty, remove them from the oven and immediately transfer to a work surface or an unheated baking sheet to cool. The nuts will continue to cook and potentially burn if not removed to a cool surface. 

To toast a small number of almonds, use a frying pan. Place the nuts in a single layer in a small dry skillet. Cook over medium heat, stirring often, for 3 to 5 minutes until they start to smell nutty and they look golden. Pay attention to the pan closely as pan-roasted almonds burn easily on the spots in contact with the pan.

romesco sauce ingredients with roasted almonds

Try this romesco sauce recipe using roasted whole almonds. Store it in a jar in the refrigerator for up to one week.

What are blanched almonds?

Blanched almonds are almonds with the skin removed. Blanching refers to briefly submerging the almonds in boiling water to loosen and remove the skins. Without skins, almonds have a shorter shelf-life but can still be roasted or processed to make almond meal, milk, or flour.

How to blanch almonds

There are two common methods for blanching almonds: an overnight soak or a 5-minute boil. Be sure to dry the almonds thoroughly after blanching in a single layer on paper towels or on dish towels. Store in an airtight container, in a cool, dark place. 

Overnight Soaking Method

Place almonds in a bowl. Fill it with cold water just until they are fully submerged. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap, a paper towel, or a loose-fitting lid, and let it sit under refrigeration overnight. Drain the water from the bowl. Gently squeeze the almonds to loosen their skins—they should slip off easily. Compost the discarded skins.

Boiling Method

Fill a small saucepan with 2 cups of water and bring it to a boil. Once it boils, add the almonds to the saucepan. Turn off the heat, cover the pan and let them rest for 2 minutes. Drain the water from the pan into a colander as soon as the skins become wrinkled. Rinse the almonds under cold water and gently squeeze the almonds to loosen their skins immediately. Start peeling the skins while the almonds are still warm—as they cool down it will become more difficult to remove the skins. 

Try this Tangy Sweet Meyer Lemon Almond Tart recipe with blanched almonds. The crust will become brown, nutty and pair perfectly with the bright, fresh meyer lemon filling.

Celebrate Summer with our First-Ever Lobster Rolls

Everything you need for a seasonal celebration is now available through Blue Apron.  

This special spread is designed to embody the spirit of summer—it’s effortless, indulgent, and fun! Whether hosting friends or making family dinner, you’ll be delighted by how easy it can be to prepare a memorable feast.

Our first-ever lobster box features traditional Maine-style lobster rolls and plenty of sides to fill out the table. Each box includes these recipes.

  • Lobster Rolls with Lemon & Chives
  • Creamy Potato Salad with Capers & Pickled Peppers
  • Corn on the Cob with Garlic & Herb Butter
  • Green Salad with Feta, Tomatoes & Radishes

To take your meal to the next level, we’re also including a few extras. Play lobster trivia with your friends or family, and use our bonus included recipe to create the perfect summer lemonade cocktail. 

The limited-time Summer Lobster Box is available to ship starting the week of June 27 through August 29 (or while supplies last), and can be ordered through Blue Apron’s website and mobile app, as well as the Market with no subscription required.

Try Our Method for Crispy Fish Skin

crispy fish skin

What’s the best part of a golden brown roasted chicken? It’s the crispy skin of course! Now think about the rubbery skin of a poached chicken. Not as appealing, right? The same principle applies to fish skin. Many home cooks are in the habit of eating the filet and leaving the skin behind. If it’s cooked properly, crispy fish skin can add a satisfying textural contrast to your plate. 

How to get crispy fish skin every time 

If you’re cooking fish in a frying pan, it’s easy to achieve crispy fish skin at home. 

Start with the right cut of fish. Not all filets are skin-on! A thick piece of fish with the skin on and scales removed is a good place to start. The skin of popular fish like salmon and steelhead is packed with healthy fats and vitamins. 

how to cook crispy fish skin

Place your pan over medium-high heat, and be sure to let it heat thoroughly before you introduce the fish. When the fish hits the pan it will generate steam, and steam is the enemy of all things crispy! The hotter the pan, the more quickly the steam will disperse. If the pan isn’t hot enough, the slowly escaping water will steam the fish skin, leaving you with a soft and soggy product. 

Don’t be afraid to use plenty of oil. Oil will help conduct heat and it will keep the skin from sticking to the pan. A generous glug (1-2 Tablespoons) of olive oil should do the trick. 

Once it’s in the pan, resist the urge to fuss with your filet. Place the fish skin-side down in the pan and don’t move it for 3-4 minutes. This helps the sear develop and keeps the skin whole. As the skin sears and renders, any stuck bits should release from the pan. If you wait to move it until it’s thoroughly crispy, it should release from the pan without any trouble. 

After the skin is nicely crispy, the top of your fish may still look a little raw. To finish it off, you can either flip the fish and cook to your desired degree of doneness, or cover the pan with aluminum oil to trap heat until the fish is cooked through. 

Try some of our favorite recipes for crispy-skinned fish filets. 

Steelhead Trout Rice Bowls with Avocado, Bok Choy & Yuzu Kosho Mayo

crispy trout skin and rice

Seared Barramundi with Collard Greens, Fregola Sarda & Shallot Agrodolce

crispy fish skin filet on cous cous

Crispy Skin Salmon & Romesco Lentils with Sweet Peppers & Lemon Yogurt