How to Store Herbs

how to store herbs in a glass
Store rooted herbs in water

Fresh herbs are irreplaceable. When you add them to a dish, they bring delicate flavors and beautiful aromatics that their dried counterparts simply can’t match. Using fresh herbs, whether it’s a few springs dropped on top of a grain bowl or several handfuls chopped into a salad, is a surefire way to take a dish from good to excellent. Cooking with herbs also shows that you care. They’re a delicious ingredient, but let’s be honest—they can be a bit fussy. A dinner packed with parsley and dill means that the cook took the time to wash, dry, and store herbs. The effort is worth it, but it’s effort nonetheless. 

Fresh herbs are often sold by the bunch, but most dishes only use a few tablespoons. This presents both a problem and an opportunity. Leftover herbs mean more flavorful meals in your future, but storing them can be a pain. Herbs have a short shelf life, and can grow limp, dry, or slimy if not used within a few days. Learning how to store herbs properly can help them last longer. Follow these tips and you should be able to get through the whole bouquet before they go bad.

How to store herbs to extend their shelf life 

If available, buy rooted herbs 

Some grocery stores and markets offer herbs with the roots attached. These bunches will last longer than trimmed alternatives. The roots can still absorb moisture and nutrients, and will help keep the plant alive if stored properly. 

Store herbs upright in glass

Fill a small glass or recycled jar with an inch of water. Arrange your leftover herbs in the glass like a bouquet of flowers and store them upright in the refrigerator. The added water will help keep the herbs fresh, and storing them upright prevents them from coming into contact with the shelves of your refrigerator. This method also keeps leftover herbs top of mind. If it’s easy to see them when you open the refrigerator, you’re more likely to remember to use them. 

Or wrap in damp paper towel

Wrapping in a damp paper towel will keep your herbs moist and organized neatly. If you’re worried about the towel absorbing odors from the refrigerator, try placing the entire bundle in a ziploc bag. 

how to store herbs in a bag
Keep the bag open to allow airflow

Avoid covering them tightly 

Most produce gives off CO2 as it rests. Trapping this gas can help fruits and vegetables ripen even after they’re picked (this is why we store unripe bananas or tomatoes in brown paper bags) but it will also accelerate decay. To keep herbs from getting slimy, make sure there’s plenty of airflow. If you’re storing them in a ziploc bag, try keeping the bag open to allow the gas to escape. 

Looking for ways to use extra herbs? Try tossing them all in a classic frittata.

What’s the Best Food to Bring to the Beach?

beach food picnic
Make sure olives are pitted

Going to the beach is supposed to be relaxing, but sometimes planning for a day of doing nothing can be surprisingly stressful. Your whole beach crew needs sun protection, a prime spot on the sand, and of course, the perfect beach food. That last item can get a little tricky—some foods are better suited for the beach than others. To make relaxing a little easier, here’s a rundown of the best foods to bring to the beach. 

To be a good beach treat, a snack needs to check a few basic boxes. The key elements of an oceanside lunch are: 

A beach food needs to travel well

From cooler, to car, to shore, it might be hours from when you pack your lunch to the time you dig in. The best beach foods should be able to hold up to the heat, and maybe even improve as they sit. This means no temperature sensitive items. Sorry, but poke is off the menu. 

Find a snack that doesn’t produce trash

The goal here is to make things easier. You don’t want to spend your day at the beach keeping track of wrappers or other refuse, and you certainly don’t want to leave anything behind on the pristine sands. If you plan ahead, this should be easy to solve for. Just pit any cherries before you pack them, slice a watermelon and discard the rind, and avoid individually wrapped snacks. 

Focus on refreshing foods

Hours out in the heat can be depleting, even if you’re just lounging. Fresh foods with a high water content and salty foods to replace lost electrolytes will keep you frolicking in the waters all afternoon. Of course, we can’t deny the pleasure of a stealthy glass or rosé or a pre-made cocktail, even if it makes you a little sleepy. Just make sure to bring along plenty of water. 

Highly recommended: 

Pre-cut fruit 

Some fruits will travel better than others. Raspberries are lovely, but are a little delicate for the beach. Strawberries with the tops trimmed off will transport well and be easy to eat. Be sure to remove any pits or peels before packing your fruit, lest you be burdened with scraps to throw away. Sliced apples may oxidize slightly, but will still be fine to eat. If you don’t like the appearance of browning, toss them in lemon juice before packing. Grapes are also a great choice.

watermelon is a good beach food

Potato chips 

Any chip will work, but potato chips are the perfect salty treat to satisfy cravings and encourage you to drink water. They’re delicious on their own, which means you don’t have to fuss with any potentially messy dips or salsas. 

Cheese and crackers

If you’re aiming for a sophisticated vibe, throw some soft cheeses in a cooler. They’ll keep well, and are delicious at room temperature. Be sure to pack the requisite tools. Having a knife, plate, and napkins will make things infinitely easier. 

Pressed sandwiches

Eventually, you may crave a more substantial meal. That’s when it’s time to bust out the sandwiches. When packing the perfect beach sandwich, the secret is in the bread. A sliced sandwich-style bread can get soft and soggy over time. A hearty baguette or ciabatta will absorb flavors and only grow more delicious. A pressed sandwich like a cuban or a pan bagnat is the ultimate travel hero—even if it ends up squished under a book, it will just enhance the flavor.   

Looking for more travel treats? Try our favorite snack for road trips.

Recipe: A Lemonade Cocktail Spiked with Basil

lemonade cocktail and a lobster roll
The perfect summer pairing

With summer in full swing, we’re all about easy entertaining. This lemonade cocktail can be served prepared in a large batch and served in a pitcher. That way, guests can help themselves to refills, and you can keep the party going. To make things even easier, the lemon basil syrup can be made the day before.

Lemonade cocktail recipe

Ingredients:

  • 8 lemons
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 4 sprigs basil
  • 16 oz gin (optional)
  • 16 oz plain sparkling water 
  • Cucumber slices (for garnishing)

Directions:

Make the lemon sugar: Wash and dry the fresh produce. Using a sharp vegetable peeler or a paring knife, peel the rind off the lemon to get long pieces of peel. In a small bowl, combine the lemon peel and sugar. Using a muddler, wooden spoon, or your hands, smash the peels and sugar together until some of the oils release and the sugar becomes fragrant. Cover and let stand for 3 hours or place in the refrigerator overnight. 

Make the lemon-basil syrup: In a small pot, combine the lemon peel and sugar mixture with 1 cup of water. Heat to boiling on medium high. Cook, stirring frequently, about 2 minutes, or until the sugar has dissolved and the mixture is hot. Turn off the heat. Add the sprigs of basil and stir to combine. Let stand until the mixture has cooled to room temperature. Strain the liquid into a bowl, discarding the lemon peel and basil sprigs. Juice the lemons, discarding any seeds. Add the lemon juice to the bowl of strained syrup and stir to combine. Transfer the mixture to a pitcher. Refrigerate until ready to serve. 

Prepare the cocktail: To the pitcher of lemon-basil syrup, add the gin, if using. Stir to combine. Add the sparkling water and stir once more. To serve, fill collins glasses with ice and pour in cocktail from the pitcher. Garnish with cucumber slices. Enjoy!

basil lemonade cocktail at lobster dinner
Serve a lemonade cocktail with your lobster feast

For an easy summer gathering, serve this lemonade cocktail with our first ever lobster box.

How to store Tomatoes

how to store summer tomatoes

Perfectly ripe tomatoes are one of the great joys of summer. Very little can compare to an heirloom tomato picked up at the farmer’s market in August, but even grocery store tomatoes will be at their best during this time. After you get home, before you get to crafting your BLT or perfect Caprese salad, you’ll want to store tomatoes in a way that preserves their flavor and texture. 

The standard advice is to store your tomatoes outside of the refrigerator. Most home refrigerators hover around 37ºF. This is much colder than the ideal temperature for a tomato. Storing a tomato in the refrigerator can mute its flavors and degrade its texture. If you’ve ever eaten a tomato with a loose skin and overly soft flesh, a refrigerator might be to blame. Local tomatoes purchased at the farmer’s market have likely never been refrigerated, and they’ll have a robust flavor to show for it. Conventional tomatoes purchased at a supermarket were probably in cold storage before hitting the shelves, and may be slightly older than their local counterparts. 

Of course, nothing in life can be simple. A perfectly ripe heirloom tomato won’t last long at room temperature. Ripe tomatoes should be eaten immediately, or they will quickly grow mold and rot. If you can’t use your ripe tomatoes immediately, storing them in the fridge will prevent rot for a few days.

Tomatoes that aren’t yet at peak ripeness should be stored on the counter. The amount of time they will last on the counter depends on environmental factors, like the heat and humidity in your apartment. To help retain moisture, store them stem-side down on a plate or tray. Over a few days, moisture can escape out of the top of a tomato if it’s stored stem-side up, causing it to turn soft and wrinkly. Storing them face down helps retain this moisture (read more about this phenomenon in this excellent article from Serious Eats). For vine-ripened or vine on tomatoes, remove the excess stem before storing. 

summer tomato sandwich

Once they reach peak ripeness, it’s time to use them. Whip up your favorite recipe or take the simple route and make a classic summer treat: a tomato sandwich with nothing but tomato, mayonnaise, and a generous sprinkle of flaky salt.

Decorate Your Table with Origami Lobster

The food is delicious, the wine is chilled, and the guests are on their way. It’s time to set the table! If you’re hosting a dinner party, why not give the place settings the same love that you gave to all the other details? Sometimes it’s the tiny extras that make a night memorable. 

origami lobster place setting
Origami lobster place setting

This summer, we’re obsessed with lobster rolls. Our lobster box makes preparing a feast easy. For extra fun, try decking out your table with these festive origami lobster. 

If you’ve ever made a paper crane, this design will be easy. Just fold neatly, have confidence, and follow the steps below. 

origami lobster step 1

1. Start with a square sheet of paper. If you’re using origami paper, the colored side should face down. 

origami lobster step 2

2. Fold the paper in half to form a triangle. Press down on the fold to form a crease. 

3. Fold the two corners together to form a smaller triangle. Press down on the fold to form a crease. 

4. With the folded edge facing to the right, lift the top half of the triangle, open it, and press it flat, as shown. 

5. Repeat on the other side. The paper should now look like a square.

6. Position your new square on the table so that the folded corner is facing up. Take the right hand corner and fold it so that the edge of the paper is aligned vertically with the center. Make a crease and unfold. Repeat with the left hand corner.

7.  Take the top corner and fold it down to the center point to form a crease. Unfold.

8. Flip the square over, and repeat step 6 on the other side. 

9. Lift up a flap from the bottom corner. Press the flap open and flatten it. It should fold along the creased lines that you formed in steps 7 and 8. 

10. Repeat step 9 on the other sign. The paper should now be shaped like a thin diamond. 

turn folds of origami lobster

11. Take the right hand corner and open it like you’re turning the page of a book. Repeat this process on the other side. The paper will now resemble a kite with two arms at the top. 

origami lobster arm

12. To form the claws of the lobster, grab one of the arms at the top. Fold the tip of the arm behind and out to the side, so that it forms a 90º angle with the centerline. Repeat with the other arm. 

origami lobster claw

13. To form the pinchers, take the tip of the arm again. Fold the tip directly up and press down to flatten, as shown above. 

folding origami lobster

14. Fold the long edges of the torso back, and tuck them inside of the body to form a thinner kite shape. 

15. To form the shell of the lobster, lift up the bottom flap of the body. Fold pleats into the body to resemble the ridges of a lobster shell. Press down to crease, and unfold. 

cut the origami lobster

16. Flip the lobster over, and use scissors to cut the back flap only. Cut up to the center of the torso. 

create origami lobster legs

17. Fold the two newly formed flaps outward to create the bottom legs of the lobster. They should be at a 90º angle with the body. 

origami lobster legs

18. Flip the lobster over again. Fold the tip of the bottom legs behind the paper so that they point directly up. 

completed origami lobster

20. Use a sharpie to add eyes to your completed origami lobster, if you wish. 

Create one origami lobster to set on each plate, or scatter them across the table for a festive touch.

Four Ways to Dress up Your Hot Dog for an Over-the-Top Fourth

loaded hot dogs
festive, loaded hot dogs

Nothing says summer like a hot dog. Whether you’re grilling dogs outside, or boiling them up in the kitchen, a loaded hot dog is the perfect way to kick off any celebration. While a simple preparation is delicious, the right toppings can transform a hot dog from a nostalgic childhood favorite into a full-blown gourmet meal. Try these preparations to add a little something special. All of our dressed up dogs start with all-beef frankfurters—these sausages are the traditional base for many styles, but feel free to improvise with your favorite brand.

Chicago-style hot dog

A Chicago-style hot dog is a classic street food in the windy city. The classic Chicago dog is topped with sweet pickle relish, tomato, sweet onion, a dill pickle spear, pickled peppers, and mustard. Traditionally, ketchup is not included on a Chicago dog, and some locals consider it taboo. Many versions are served on a poppy seed bun.

New York-style hot dog

To keep things simple, try a New York hotdog-cart-inspired dog. We’ve topped our version with sauerkraut, mustard, and ketchup for a sweet and tangy bite.

Chili cheese dog

Chili cheese dogs originated in Pennsylvania, with deep roots in Scranton, Philadelphia, and western New York. These decadent dogs should be topped with a traditional meat chili (no beans!), shredded cheese, and chopped white onions.

Kimchi dog

For an international take, try a loaded hot dog topped with kimchi. This Korean-fermented cabbage will bring the same briny kick you get from sauerkraut, along with a little spice and additional complexity. If you like a little something, this is the dog for you. Our version is topped with Kimchi, shredded cabbage, and sriracha mayo.

Looking for a summery dessert to fill up your plate? Try this no-fuss strawberry crostata.

Best Wines for Summer Dinners

The best wines for summer depend on the occasion. Some of our warm weather favorites are perfect for sipping on the beach, while others are best when paired with dinner.

Summer is traditionally a time for chilled whites and rosé wines, but if you’re serving up hearty grilled fare, a robust red will bring out the best in your dinner. Try some of these bottles to keep your glass filled all summer long.

Sparkling wine

best wines for summer, sparkling
Sparkling wine bundle

Blue Barrel brut sparkling wines are delicious on their own, with salty cheeses, or with delicate summer seafoods. Try enjoying these wines chilled with grilled shrimp or raw oysters for a delightful summery treat.

 Pairing tip: For fresh flavor, try a high-acid wine

Wines with tart acidity can enhance the flavors of fresh vegetables. Try a bright white like a sauvignon blanc to enliven our Summer Bean & Goat Cheese Panzanella.

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Big bold reds

best red wines for summer
Big bold reds bundle


Delicate whites can be a lovely summer treat, but when the grill is out, a red is your best bet. Complex, smoky wines like the el Rede malbec will enhance the flavor of the grill and pair well with beautifully charred steaks or burgers.

Pairing tip: Make it meaty

An oak-aged red wine will combine fruity flavors with notes of warming spice. These full flavors complement richer dishes, and the tannins will cleanse and prime your palate for another bite. Pair reds with burgers like our Ginger Pork Burger.

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Pairing tip: Spice is nice

Dishes with plents of spices—not hot spice, per se—can play well with the spice aromas in oak-aged red wine. Try an oaky red with dishes like our Spiced Lamb & Beef Tagine.

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Beautiful rosé wines

rose wines for summer
Endless summer rosé bundle

The thing to love about this wine is how delightfully deceptive it is. Its fruity aromas suggest the wine is sugary—yet it’s almost completely dry, with a bright zestiness that makes your mouth water for more. The powerful, alluring aromas and overall vibrancy of the wine are what help it pair so well with wildly different types of dishes.

Paring tip: Think light, summery fare

A light, crisp wine draws out the fresh flavors of vegetables, and makes something like a simple as a salad taste more exciting. These particular wine’s aromas will add an extra dimension to our Romaine, Potato & Snap Pea Salad.

Pairing tip: Opposites often do attract

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In the same way that fruit matches spice or hot matches sour, a light, floral wine can often provide a delightful contrast to an earthy, savory dish. Sometimes it takes just one ingredient to bridge the gap, as black garlic does in our Shoyu Ramen.

Try these wines by subscription, or order ala carte from our marketplace.

Celebrate Summer with our First-Ever Lobster Rolls

Everything you need for a seasonal celebration is now available through Blue Apron.  

This special spread is designed to embody the spirit of summer—it’s effortless, indulgent, and fun! Whether hosting friends or making family dinner, you’ll be delighted by how easy it can be to prepare a memorable feast.

Our first-ever lobster box features traditional Maine-style lobster rolls and plenty of sides to fill out the table. Each box includes these recipes.

  • Lobster Rolls with Lemon & Chives
  • Creamy Potato Salad with Capers & Pickled Peppers
  • Corn on the Cob with Garlic & Herb Butter
  • Green Salad with Feta, Tomatoes & Radishes

To take your meal to the next level, we’re also including a few extras. Play lobster trivia with your friends or family, and use our bonus included recipe to create the perfect summer lemonade cocktail. 

The limited-time Summer Lobster Box is available to ship starting the week of June 27 through August 29 (or while supplies last), and can be ordered through Blue Apron’s website and mobile app, as well as the Market with no subscription required.

How to Make the Perfect Cheese Board

Creamy brie, salty gouda, and funky blue cheese make a balanced board.

Nothing gets a party going like a cheese board: it breaks the ice, provides a place to congregate, and gets the people snacking. While no one will turn her nose up at a box of crackers and block of extra sharp cheddar, a truly next-level cheeseboard is both impressive and easy to put together—so long as you’ve got a game plan. Read on for our guidelines and a few pro tips.

The Best Cheese for a Cheese Board

The cheese is the reason we’re all here, but the best advice is to keep it simple. Odd numbers tend to look best on a board, so pick three delicious, interesting, eclectic cheeses. Age, texture, and origin are they key factors to consider: one creamy, one crumbly, and one funky cheese is a good place to start.

cut cheese board

PRO TIP: Cut small pieces or slices into your cheese before you put the board out for guests; this is a great way to suggest a serving size, create motion in your presentation, and make people feel comfortable to dive right in. No “first person to cut into the cheese” jitters.

What is a Charcuterie Board

Charcuterie is the French word to describe cured and cooked meats like pâté, bacon, and cured salami. Incorporating some charcuterie into your cheese board, or building a separate charcuterie board with an array of cured meats, will add luxurious flavor and texture to your spread. Try visiting a local butcher to what’s in stock. Freshly shaved prosciutto and whole dried sausages will beat the precut stuff at the supermarket any day.

Picking Meats for a Charcuterie Board

Balance is key when it comes to the carnivore-friendly part of your cheese board. Texture and flavor are the most important variables: try pairing delicate prosciutto (a fan favorite) with one hard, cured salame (such as chorizo) and one soft salame (like soppressata). Avoid overkill on salt or spice. If you’ve loaded up on powerful flavors, add a slice of pâté or terrine to provide a mild foil for them.

PRO TIP: Lili Dagan, Culinary Manager, is the resident cheese board expert in the Test Kitchen after years perfecting the craft while working in events. Her signature move? A meat river. Fanning out delicately rumpled prosciutto or slices of salami into a ribbon that travels from one end of the board to the other makes the arrangement feel ample and deliberate.

cheese board with prosciutto

Other Additions to a Cheese & Charcuterie Board

A cheese board goes from good to great with the addition of a few *extras* — some crunchy, tender, sweet, and pickly bits to cut through the salt and fat of the main event. Little bowls of one-biters like roasted nuts or olives, provide necessary textural contrast. Briny bites like a cornichons or gherkins refresh your palate. Finish things off with a few condiments. Grainy mustard, honey, and jam all adds a spreadable or drizzly pop of flavor. The sweet and salty contrast of jam or honey will work will with almost any cheese.

Best Crackers for Cheese

PRO TIP: Don’t forget the carbs. Your cheeses and spreads will be SO lonely without something to put them on. Simple crackers will do the trick, providing a dependable base without overpowering any exciting flavors. For a gourmet touch, try this: thinly slice a baguette, brush it with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, and toast in a 400ºF oven for 15-20 minutes, flipping once.

cheese board with fruit

Charcuterie & Cheese Board Tips

Fruit is your friend! Celebrate the time of year by adding some seasonal produce to your board. Concord grapes and stone fruit in the summer or citrus and pears in the winter add color, freshness, and a welcome respite from cheese.

PRO TIP: Temperature matters. Take your cheese out of the refrigerator at least 1 hour before you plan to serve it, to come to room temperature. A cheese’s flavor, smell, and texture changes in the cold (and not in a good way), and you want those wedges and wheels to shine!


cheese board with meat and wine

Charcuterie & Cheese Board Pairings

Cheese’s best friend? Wine, of course. Check out the Blue Apron collection of food-friendly white wines, six wines to pair with your festive holiday cheese board.

Cool, Creamy, Craveable Tzatziki

tzatziki recipe with toasted pita chips
Creamy tzatziki with toasted pita chips

Tzatziki is a creamy yogurt-based sauce with origins dating back to the Ottoman empire. In the U.S.,tzatziki is often associated with Greek food, but in reality it’s common in much of Southern Europe, as well in the Middle East. 

What is tzatziki 

Tzatziki has been around for 1000s of years, and there have been quite a few variations on the recipe over time. Some recipes call for mint and cucumbers, while others favor dill. It can be a thick and chunky dip, or a thin sauce. There are some constants: tzatziki is always a yogurt-based sauce with fresh herbs. 

What to eat with tzatziki

Tzatziki is an excellent complement to falafel or grilled meats. It can also be served as a dip alongside toasted pita and assorted vegetables, or slathered on a meaty sandwich. When served with hot food, this cool sauce provides a pleasant temperature contrast. 

tzatziki recipe with salad
Top grilled chicken with tzatziki for a satisfying salad

Cucumber tzatziki recipe 

  • 1 C yogurt 
  • 1 garlic clove
  • ¼ C cucumber, small-diced
  • 2 tsps lemon juice

1. Prep the garlic. If you have a microplane, grate the garlic into a fine paste. If you don’t have a microplane, use a chef’s knife to finely mince the garlic. You can also substitute a pinch of garlic powder, if necessary. 

2. Combine all ingredients in a medium bowl and season to taste. Tzatziki can be served right away, but the flavor will improve over time. If possible, chill for 2 hours before serving. Tzatziki will keep in the fridge in a sealed container for up to a week.

Lemon dill tzatziki recipe 

  • 1 C yogurt 
  • 1 bunch dill, picked and finely chopped
  • 1 lemon, zested
  • 1 garlic clove 

1. Prep the garlic. If you have a microplane, grate the garlic into a fine paste. If you don’t have a microplane, use a chef’s knife to finely mince the garlic. You can also substitute a pinch of garlic powder, if necessary. 

2. Combine all ingredients in a medium bowl and season to taste. Tzatziki can be served right away, but the flavor will improve over time. If possible, chill for 2 hours before serving. Tzatziki will keep in the fridge in a sealed container for up to a week.

Spice Up Your Summer with Adventurous Eating

Summer adventures can happen anywhere. You can find them on a trip, in your own backyard, or even in your kitchen. This year, try spicing up your summer with adventurous flavors.

It’s easy! An adventurous flavor is just one that is new to you. It could be as simple as cooking something for the first time, or giving a second chance to a food you didn’t love right away. These are some of our favorite ingredients to use when we’re craving a bold summer adventure. 

For Middle-eastern inspired dishes, try adding a dash of za’atar. This blend of dried herbs is delicious on roasted vegetables and meats, or even in grain bowls. It often includes oregano, sesame seeds, sumac, and Aleppo pepper. This blend has a pleasantly tangy flavor. 

Zaatar (left) and Aleppo pepper (right)

Sweet and smoky guajillo peppers are a delicious way to take your tastebuds on a quick trip to South America. We love to use them in Mexican-inspired dishes, and as the base of lightly spicy sauces. 

For even more spice, turn up the heat with this Japanese-style pepper blend. Chicmi Togarashi is a traditional spice blend used in Japanese cooking. There are many different recipes, but traditional blends usually include ginger, orange zest, and nori in addition to ground pepper. That means this blend packs a lot of sweet and savory flavor along with some heat. 

Kick your summer adventures off the right way with dinner and a movie. Get cooking, and don’t miss Disney and Pixar’s new movie, Luca, now streaming on Disney+.

How to Cut Corn Off the Cob

Summery corn salads are the best. The only downside is cleaning all of the corn kernels off your kitchen floor. Luckily, we have the perfect chef tip to show you how to cut corn off the cob and make sure it all ends up in your salad. 

It’s actually simple, all you need is a whole ear of corn, a chef’s knife, and a clean kitchen towel or a sheet pan. To get started, prepare the corn according to your recipe. This technique will work on grilled, boiled, or raw corn. It all depends on your final meal. 

Lay the clean kitchen towel down across a cutting board and stand the corn on its wider end. Take your chef’s knife in your dominant hand and hold the corn with your other. Then, simply slice under the kernels and next to the cob with long knife strokes. The kernels will fall away from the cob and land in the towel. If you prefer, you can also use a sheet pan, as shown in the video below. Either of these methods will allow you to easily slice all the way down the cob without working around a bowl. The towel has the added benefit of a little shock absorption—it prevents the kernels from bouncing off the counter.

After you’ve removed all of the kernels, transporting them is easy. Just transport the tray or pick up the towel by its corners so that all of the kernels fall to the center. Use the towel to carry the corn over to a bowl.

After that, it’s time to cook! Here are some of our favorite ways to use fresh corn.

Corn & Zucchini Pasta with Spicy Ricotta

Guajillo Chicken Tacos with Creamy Corn & Jalapeño

Hand-Cut Pappardelle with Corn, Tomatoes & Parmesan

how to cut corn off the cob for pasta

Watch the video above to see our chef demonstrate this technique.